Three years later: FNB and inaccessibility to blind and visually impaired customers

The below is an email response on a mailing list where the topic of FNB seems to be quite hot at present.

 

There are some members who want to keep it quiet as they would like to keep it internal but, as another poster pointed out:

 

“We have a right to our independence and it is up to us to claim that right.
I agree that the fact that one receives an SMS later to confirm a transaction, is just not good enough; nor is the fact that one immediately might get back one’s card. The person at the shop could easily write down one’s PIN for later use the next time you unsuspectingly rock up at the shop. Besides, this lack of assertiveness would only further create the impression that we are happy to acquiesce in the development of inaccessible facilities and would find ourselves having to rely on the eyes of others more and more. Instead of trying to get workarounds, we should strongly oppose things like inaccessible POS, online banking, SARS eFiling, prepaid meters, unmarked hotel key cards, etc. These developers have got away with it precisely because we have not opposed those developments vigorously enough and have been satisfied with the consolation prizes of confirmation SMSes after the fact and the eyes of others.

Blind SA has an Advocacy and Information committee which is currently grappling with all the matters I mentioned above. FNB’s attitude is shocking, to say the least, but if necessary, we will take them to the SAHRC or even the Constitutional Court. Continue reading Three years later: FNB and inaccessibility to blind and visually impaired customers

ABSA, joining the FNB camp of non-cooperation – not interested in the blind or visually impaired

Difficulties regarding independence, recognition, rights, etc. is an ongoing fact of life if You are a person living with a disability.

Recently I got quite involved in the accessibility and disability rights arena.

I encountered touch screen card machines on one of my shopping trips but, dismissed it and shopped somewhere else instead but, when I received an email regarding the experience of another person, I realized that this is going to become a problem.

I quote:

My request to you then, do you have sufficient contact with the others banks mentioned above to address this matter? It simply is not acceptable that a blind person will have to be dependent on someone else to enter his / her PIN at these point of sale machines.

End of quote:

Now, this is only one issue that was raised.  Continue reading ABSA, joining the FNB camp of non-cooperation – not interested in the blind or visually impaired