iTunes Vouchers for the US App Store.

Need to buy an app that is not available in your country’s app store? Perhaps, you don’t have your own credit card but, someone is willing to put money onto a voucher for you? Just maybe, you’d like to do an EFT to buy this app… Either way, buying iTunes gift vouchers is not difficult.

I’ve decided to write this post, after some questions were posed by some on the NAPSA email list.

Please note: These vouchers will not work in the South African App Store.

I assume that you already have a US account for iTunes.

When shopping around for vouchers, you have to remember that you will almost never pay the actual value of the voucher that you are purchasing.

Example: If you buy a $10.00 gift voucher, you may pay up to $14 for this $10.00 gift voucher. I guess, they’ve got to make their profit; they’ve also got to eat, and all that.

So, I guess, what I actually want to say is that you should always shop around; no matter what you’re shopping for.

Disclaimer: I do not claim that anything here is correct at all. Please verify everything for yourself before making any purchases. Prices and links last verified on the 14th of August, 2012.

 

Gift Voucher Value

Actual price of what you will pay in US Dollar.

Name of store

Link where you can purchase the gift voucher

Delivery method

How long does e-mail delivery take.

Do they sell UK iTunes gift cards as well?

Is the Sign up process accessible?

Sign up Link

iTunes $10 Card

$13.50

evopoints

Purchase link.

E-mail

If paid by credit card, immediately. If by EFT, when proof of payment has been received and funds

cleared.

No

No

Sign up.

iTunes $10 Card

$12.45

iEverything.co.za

Purchase

link.

E-mail

Not known

No

Yes

Sign up.

iTunes $10 Card

$11.99

Maximus cards

Purchase link.

E-mail

Immediately

Yes

No need to sign up.

No need to sign up.

iTunes $15 Card

$19.58

evopoints

Purchase link.

E-mail

If paid by credit card, immediately. If by EFT, when proof of payment has been received and funds

cleared.

No

No

Sign up.

iTunes $15 Card

$17.95

iEverything.co.za

Purchase

link.

E-mail

Not known

No

Yes

Sign up.

iTunes $15 Card

$17.49

Maximus cards

Purchase link.

E-mail

Immediately

Yes

No need to sign up.

No need to sign up.

iTunes $25 Card

$30.66

evopoints

Purchase link.

E-mail

If paid by credit card, immediately. If by EFT, when proof of payment has been received and funds

cleared.

No

No

Sign up.

iTunes $25 Card

$29.45

iEverything.co.za

Purchase

link.

E-mail

Not known

No

Yes

Sign up.

iTunes $25 Card

$29.49

Maximus cards

Purchase link.

E-mail

Immediately

Yes

No need to sign up.

No need to sign up.

iTunes $50 Card

$60.96

evopoints

Purchase link.

E-mail

If paid by credit card, immediately. If by EFT, when proof of payment has been received and funds

cleared.

No

No

Sign up.

iTunes $50 Card

$58.45

iEverything.co.za

Purchase

link.

E-mail

Not known

No

Yes

Sign up.

iTunes $50 Card

$58.49

Maximus cards

Purchase link.

E-mail

Immediately

Yes

No need to sign up.

No need to sign up.

iTunes $100 Card

$120.50

evopoints

Purchase link.

E-mail

If paid by credit card, immediately. If by EFT, when proof of payment has been received and funds

cleared.

No

No

Sign up.

iTunes $100 Card

$116.00

iEverything.co.za

Purchase

link.

E-mail

Not known

No

Yes

Sign up.

Fleksy – A very quick audio intro

Fleksy is a text input system specifically designed for people with visual impairments.

This free app gives you the full Fleksy typing experience, with the option to upgrade to the full version to email, copy, or message the text you enter from within the application itself.

For those who are too lazy to install the demo yourself, or if you don’t have access to an IOS device, I’ve given a very basic demonstration of how fleksy works. No word correction or anything more complicated.

The podcast is right at the end of this post.

How to use Fleksy

Fleksy is complementary to Apple’s VoiceOver technology.

With Fleksy, you don’t have to hover over the keyboard to find the correct letter You need to lightly tap once where you think the letter roughly is, and continue with the next letter. Avoid pressing and holding on each key and waiting to hear feedback.

To type “bananas” for example, first tap approximately where you think the letter B is. That should be near the middle and bottom part of the screen, and you only need to do a single tap. Don’t worry about being too accurate. You will hear a clicking sound to indicate that a keypress has been registered. Next tap where you think the letter A is. That should be on the left part of the screen, and somewhat higher than your previous tap. Continue tapping the rest of the letters N A N A S to form the word “bananas”.

Once you are done typing a word, perform a right swipe gesture to indicate a space. The system will automatically correct your input and read out the word that you typed.

To type your next word, you simply start tapping on the next letters as described. Make sure to spell words correctly.

If the suggestion was not right the first time, you can swipe down to navigate between alternative suggestions. Or swipe left to delete the last word you entered and enter a different one.

Fleksy has more functions for entering punctuation marks, typing custom words (such as names), and includes innovative ways to help you type easily. Make sure you read the instructions contained within the app.

Visit the developer’s web site.

Get fleksy on the appstore.

[appstore id=”520337246″ country=”za” style=”full”]

AAS Insight #221: Round-up, Qt, and patents

In All About Symbian Insight number 221, Steve, Rafe and David open with a news round up covering a number of apps and services including Groupon, Nimbuzz, BBC iPlayer, Nokia Software Updater for Mac, and CoverUp. In the second half of the podcast Rafe and David discuss, in more detail, the acquisition of Qt by Digia from Nokia, and the sale of 500 patents by Nokia to Vringo.

This podcast was recorded on Friday 10th August 2012.

In this podcast we cover:

Groupon on Symbian
Nimbuzz updated to version 3.4
BBC iPlayer downloads withdrawn for S60 5th Edition devices
Nokia Software Updater for Mac ceases development
CoverUp returns to the Nokia Store
Digia to acquire Qt from Nokia
Vringo acquires 500 patents from Nokia

You can listen to earlier episodes of the AAS Insight Podcast in our media section.

Source: All about symbian  

Seika Mini Braille Display, affordable, portable and stylish

Note to current users of the Seika Mini Braille Display:
A new firmware version has been released for the Seika Mini Braille Display.
Download the new firmware Ver1.007 from here.

NIPPON TELESOFT CO., LTD. brings you the new Seika Mini Braille display. Sporting 16 cells of high quality 8 dot Braille, in a truely light and portable package; weighing a mere 300 Grams.

I’ve had the pleasure to put this Braille display through its paces for two weeks, thanks to Neville Clarence of
NCTec,
who made the Seika Mini available to me for evaluation.

Before I get down to my opinion, here’s the specifications for the Seika Mini Braille Display:

Specifications:

  • Display Capacity: 16 refreshable 8-dots Braille cells
  • Cursor routing Key: 16 keys
  • Function Keys: 4 function keys, 2 Navigation joystick keys
  • Braille input keys: 8 keys
  • Character code: Original 8 code
  • Memory: 4GB (Embedded Micro SD card)
  • Connectivity: USB, Mini USB, Micro SD card slot
  • Internal battery: Lithium rechargeable battery
  • Charge time: 2.5 hours(the charge time will longer if use Mini at the same time)
  • Power Supply: USB/AC Adapter/ Internal battery
  • Size: 6.3(W) 3.78(D) 0.9(H) inches.
  • Weight: 300g
  • Accessories:
    • Leather carry case,Neck strap,
    • AC adaptor (5V / 1A)
    • USB Cable (one head is USB male, the other head is mini USB male), it is primarily used for battery charging and screen reader data transfer)
    • Bluetooth USB Adapter
    • 4G Micro SD card which is in the Mini Seika in default
    • Documentation and Drivers on a CD
    • User Guide, in print