South African Banking Accessibility Survey for blind and visually impaired persons

If you are living in South Africa and live with a visual impairment, you are no doubt one of those who might have received terrible service from your bank.

 

Or, just perhaps they might have amazed you with their accessibility of their products and/or services.

 

You may also recall the difficulty that I’ve had with FNB in the past and ABSA who joined them in ignoring our calls for action on fixing the inaccessibility of their services.  If you haven’t read those articles, let me just say that their attitude stinks and that FNB still dismissed my request for dialogue even though I have approached them as the representative of Blind SA, a national consumer organization of and for the blind.

 

Either way, we have finally launched the South African Banking Survey that you can now complete.

 

The purpose of this survey is to gain a greater understanding of the service needs of people with visual impairment who are making use of products and/or services provided by banks in South Africa.

 

We are seeking people who are blind or visually impaired (or their caregivers), who are willing to complete a few questions.

 

If you want to be contacted for assistance to complete the survey, please let us know on Facebook or on Twitter.  Optionally, please phone us on 0127533663.

 

Thank you to Unlocking Abilities (PTY) Ltd. for hosting the survey.

SA varsity develops tech to detect hearing disability

The University of Pretoria has developed low-cost technology that helps in diagnosing hearing disability.

The technology, called hearScreen, is a patented smartphone application that provides a mobile health solution for early detection of hearing loss and links patients to required health services. The software can turn any smartphone into an audiometer to test people’s hearing. Continue reading SA varsity develops tech to detect hearing disability

Call+ – not accessible to blind users on Android

What is Call+?

Call+ is an app with in-app purchases but, essentially you can make phone calls to regular phones to a number of countries absolutely free.

 

There are versions for both iOS and Android.

 

I downloaded the app from the Android Playstore and installed it on an LG G2 running Android v4.4, KitKat with the Talkback beta installed.

 

The installation of Call+ took a few seconds on my 3g connection.

 

Upon opening the app, I was asked to enter my own phone number to
initiate the app.

 

The list of countries was easy to navigate and I managed to select South
Africa reasonably quick.

It would be nice if I could just type in the first few letters but, hey,
I only have to do this once so, no big deal.

 

After I have selected South Africa, I entered the rest of my phone
number in the edit field just below.

And a little further down, there was a start button with terms and
conditions just underneath that.

 

I double tapped on the start button to continue and was asked to confirm
if my number is such and such.

 

Here I was given two options.  I could edit my number by double tapping
the edit button or the ok button if I was satisfied and yes, my number
was entered correctly so, I decided to proceed.

 

When I double tapped ok, I was told that an sms was sent to my number.

 

This sms contained a 6 digit code that I then entered into the provided
edit field.

 

On this screen, you are also able to request for the system to phone you
instead with a code.  By proceeding, you also acknowledge that you agree
with the terms and conditions.

 

Upon completing the entry, it just jumped to the next screen without
warning.

 

Everything on this screen was 100% inaccessible.

 

The app on Android is useless from this point on.

How developers can make such mistakes is beyond me.

It is almost as if they are doing this intentionally.

 

I contacted the developer so, let’s see what kind of response I’ll be getting from them.

Web site and download

Visit the Call+ web site at www.callpl.us.

You can download Call+ from the Android Playstore or from Apple’s Appstore.

New navigational app for blind people on Android coming soon.

A group of six grade school girls in Los Fresnos, Texas took it upon themselves to solve a problem for blind kids. They built an app for them.

The app, Hello Navi, first came from the imagination of a particular girl in the group, Grecia Cano. She says her heart went out to the blind students in her school who had a hard time figuring out how to get around.
Continue reading New navigational app for blind people on Android coming soon.

A quick demo of TapTapSee on Android

Description

TapTapSee is designed to help the blind and visually impaired identify objects they encounter in their daily lives. Simply double tap the screen to take a photo of anything, at any angle, and hear the app speak the identification back to you.

(Note: Spoken identification requires Talkback to be turned on).

TapTapSee helps the blind and visually impaired become more independent in their day-to-day activities.

Continue reading A quick demo of TapTapSee on Android